UltraViolet – newsletter of LAGAI – Queer Insurrection

LAGAI – Queer Insurrection started in 1983, as Lesbians and Gays Against Intervention in Latin America.  Our name and the issues we work on have evolved over the years nearly 30 years we have been around.  We are a radical queer anti-assimilationalist activist group in the San Francisco Bay Area.

In 1988 we started a newsletter called “Out!”, a play on U.S. Out (at that time principally of Central America, which our government was in the process of invading — remember Honduras and Panama?) and, obviously, Out of the Closet and Into the Streets. A few years later, every queer rag in the country was calling itself Out and we decided to change the name. After many long and hilarious debates over what to call it, we settled on UltraViolet – the invisible fringe of the rainbow.

UV is a forum for discussion of issues important to the queer community, a source of information about political issues and actions you don’t hear enough about in the mainstream (and mainstream gay) press, and a place where we get to be wild and wacky and witty on any subject that particularly interests us at the moment. We mail it out for free four or five times a year to 1700 people, about 1000 of whom are prisoners. Sometimes people who like it send us money, which we really appreciate.  We receive no funding except the occasional donation from friends and fans and even more occasional grants from very tiny, grassroots funders like Resist.

To get UV in the mail, send your snail mail address to info@lagai.org or write to us at 3543 18th St. #26, San Francisco, CA 94110.

To subscribe by email, click on the “Follow UV” link at the right-hand side of this blog.

We are very interested in news and views from queers in the Bay Area and beyond.  To query us about story ideas, please email us.  Articles in general should be about 750 words or less.  We receive a lot of articles and letters from queer prisoners and we publish some in every issue.  We do not publish poetry except by dead queers.

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